Saturday 27 September 2014
Meeting Janet Froelich

Sometimes a good question is more important than a good answer. While everybody can have an answer, questions make you pause and reflect. Janet Froelich’s questions make us doubt and they make us think. They make us smarter and more creative. Her thoughtful, »Could it be…? « tends to trigger a chain of thought that in turn leads to new and interesting queries.

Janet Froelich is one of few American women we’ve met to without hesitation call herself a feminist. »It’s not something I think a whole lot about, it’s part of who I am and how I see the world.« In fact, she began her successful career at a feminist publication, Heresies, when she – after 10 years as an abstract painter – swapped solitary hours in the studio for all-nighters and collective discussions about photos and headlines. At the time, in the 1970s, art direction was not a high status profession. She says they called it commercial art and in the world of fine arts, from which she came, that was perhaps the least well-regarded thing there was. »I mean it’s not like it’s art«, Janet might say of her work.

We meet for the first time in 2009, at a fancy hotel on Union Square where we are supposed to have breakfast together. The music is loud and our waiter tells us it is impossible to lower it, right before he pours coffee into a cup full of tea. Janet is polite but strict when she draws his attention to his mistake and asks for a new cup. In one fell swoop she demonstrates her abilities as a leader in her way of deftly taking charge of the situation. We’re impressed. To us, Janet Froelich is the epitome of a professional woman in New York. Elegant, cool, friendly and appropriate.

Ever since she was a girl, Janet Froelich has had a powerful drive, a competitive spirit and a will to always do better. She says she doesn’t know where it comes from, but over the course of our conversation she draws parallels between athletics and the professional world and says that everybody should be involved in sports at some point in their life. That is where you hone your competitive instinct, set clear goals and learn to lose. The latter is something she thinks women are often less good at. In part due to the fact that it was more common for boys than girls to grow up with sports, at least in her generation.

Over that breakfast, she tells of a fresh start in her career. She is beginning a new job that week; after 22 years as art director and creative director at The New York Times Magazine and T Style, she is moving to Real Simple, a lifestyle publication for working women. She is full of anticipation and yet again, we are impressed.

Janet Froelich was born in Brooklyn and raised in the suburbs of New York. She studied fine art at Cooper Union and later pursued a M.F.A. at Yale. It wasn’t until she came into contact with and worked for Heresies that she found her calling in graphic design. With bare-bones qualifications she got a job at the Daily News Magazine, which in time lead her to the position of art director at The New York Times Magazine, and later The New York Times Style Magazine .

The New York Times magazines have won countless prizes under her leadership. Her style is visually strong and extremely catchy, but always intelligent and elegant. Janet tells us that the big difference between The Times magazines and Real Simple is that while the first is a supplement in a newspaper, the latter is sold on the newsstand, which has presented a big challenge. It seems paradoxical to us that The Times Magazine would be a publication not intended for the newsstand, since we feel we would be drawn like magnets to each and every cover if we saw it on the shelf. The endless variations on the T in T Magazine, by various creators is genius and brings out the collectors in us.

Our meeting with Janet Froelich planted a seed. Once back in Sweden we don’t quite know what to do with our project, but Janet’s interest and questions have made us confident that this is important. We are egged on by her urging that something concrete must come of our informal meetings with nine of the world’s foremost (female) designers in New York.

Another idea that takes root is Janet’s thoughts on women and athletics. When we get home we start working our bodies, spending more time at soccer fields, boxing rings and gyms. It turns out to be surprisingly easy to compete with men in the only realm in which there are biological differences in the basic conditions for success. When we take on the men at local gyms doing push-ups, we feel that competing on equal ground in design should be easy.

– Samira Bouabana, Angela Tillman Sperandio, 2013

Preface: Hall of Femmes: Janet Froelich, 2013
Editor: Sarah Clyne Sundberg

Buy the book here.
Buy the poster here.

Posted by: 06:33

Tags: , , , ,

Categories: Janet Froelich, Preface, Sarah Clyne Sundberg

NEWSLETTER

ARCHIVE

CATEGORIES


TAGS